Forsyth Astronomical Society http://www.fas37.org/wp Look Up and Enjoy the Sky Fri, 30 Jun 2017 21:34:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 http://www.fas37.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/cropped-telescope-32x32.png Forsyth Astronomical Society http://www.fas37.org/wp 32 32 Young Astronomers Newsletter July 2017 http://www.fas37.org/wp/young-astronomers-newsletter-july-2017/ Fri, 30 Jun 2017 21:34:31 +0000 http://www.fas37.org/wp/?p=1829 Continue reading ]]> The Young Astronomers Newsletter

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The Young Astronomers Newsletter Volume 25 Number 7 July 2017

By Bob Patsiga

 

 

In this month’s edition of the newsletter Bob discusses:

  • NASA’s plans to send a probe to our sun mid next year.
  • A third detection of gravity waves by LIGO.
  • New moons found orbiting our solar system’s largest planetary body.
  • Some interesting information concerning rate of star formation in ours other galaxies.
  • Information about whether or not there is water in any appreciable quantities on Mars.
  • Astronomical birthdays for the month of July.
  • Celestial happenings, Moon phases, planets and even a meteor shower.
  • A facts section on the upcoming eclipse is August 21st.
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Stone Mountain Observation 7/1 Cancelled http://www.fas37.org/wp/stone-mountain-observation-71-cancelled/ Fri, 30 Jun 2017 15:14:38 +0000 http://www.fas37.org/wp/?p=1827 Continue reading ]]> The scheduled observation at Stone Mountain State Park for this Saturday July 1st has been cancelled due to weather conditions.  Our next scheduled public observation event is Saturday July 29th at Stone Mountain State park as well. A final weather call will be made the Friday before. Hopefully we will have better conditions then.

 

 

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June Meeting of the Forsyth Astronomical Society 6/27 http://www.fas37.org/wp/june-meeting-of-the-forsyth-astronomical-society-627/ Mon, 26 Jun 2017 16:44:29 +0000 http://www.fas37.org/wp/?p=1824 Continue reading ]]> The Forsyth Astronomical Society will host their next monthly meeting on June 27th at 7:30 PM at Kaleideum (formerly Sciworks) in Winston-Salem. The program this month will be a video presentation on the history of the telescope. Following the presentation portion, we will have a brief business meeting and as always, there will be an informal social gathering 30 minutes or so before the meeting. All meetings are open to the public, free of charge and all are welcome. Hope to see you there.

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Young Astronomers Newsletter June 2017 http://www.fas37.org/wp/young-astronomers-newsletter-june-2017/ Mon, 05 Jun 2017 04:41:17 +0000 http://www.fas37.org/wp/?p=1818 Continue reading ]]> The Young Astronomers Newsletter

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The Young Astronomers Newsletter Volume 25 Number 6 June 2017

By Bob Patsiga

 

 

In this month’s edition of the newsletter Bob discusses:

  • NASA’s early stage planning for its mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa.
  • Progress of the multinational World-Wide Radio Telescope array.
  • Results from research done at University of Southampton, England concerning fatality statistics for asteroid impacts.
  • Results from the time analysis done for a round trip mission to Mars,
  • Some interesting finding from NASA’s Van Allen probes concerning the effects of man made  VLF, very low frequency, radiation.
  • June’s astronomical birthdays.
  • Celestial happenings form the month of June.
  • This month’s edition also includes a summer sky map and a map of the path of totality for the total eclipse happening in August.
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Last Minute Observation at Kaleideum North Saturday June 3rd http://www.fas37.org/wp/last-minute-observation-at-kaleideum-north-saturday-june-3rd/ Fri, 02 Jun 2017 16:37:32 +0000 http://www.fas37.org/wp/?p=1814 Continue reading ]]> Sorry for the last-minute notification FAS folks and fans but there is a scheduled public observation at Kaleideum North, formerly Sciworks, this Saturday June 3rd. The weather is looking pretty good and it has been posted and promoted on the Kaleideum calendar, so we are a GO!

 

Sunset is at around 8:30 PM and the observing will begin as darkness permits. Items of interest that we can show you will include the Moon, Jupiter, several types of stars including binaries, various star clusters and possibly even some galaxies, though they will be faint, in some of the larger scopes available. Saturn may even be high enough in the sky to catch towards the end of the evening. The weather is going to be fairly mild so no heavy coats needed. We might would suggest insect repellant though.

Again I apologize for the short notice, this event slipped through the cracks of getting posted to the calendar.

We hope to see you there.

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Last Minute Calendar Change for Stone Mtn Observation http://www.fas37.org/wp/last-minute-calendar-change-for-stone-mtn-observation/ Fri, 26 May 2017 17:05:08 +0000 http://www.fas37.org/wp/?p=1809 Continue reading ]]>

 

The FAS has an observation event at Stone Mountain State Park scheduled for tomorrow evening. That event has been canceled due to unfavorable weather conditions. THIS evening though, looks to be almost prime conditions to observe. So, we have worked it out with our ranger liaison to have our event this evening instead. We will be located in the central field of the family camping area. This is typically a lock in event but recent park regulation changes have opened the family camping area to exiting the park early if you like. Sunset is at 8:30PM and we will begin viewing as darkness permits. Access to the site can be obtained via a walking path between campsites 35 & 36. Parking is available at the bathhouse near the observation site. Please be respectful of other’s camp sites and privacy. Please do not park in the individual site parking areas or walk through someone’s campsite if you are a non camping guest. Click the image below to see an enlarged version of the campground map.

 

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May Meeting of the Forsyth Astronomical Society 5/23 http://www.fas37.org/wp/1803-2/ Mon, 22 May 2017 04:02:47 +0000 http://www.fas37.org/wp/?p=1803 Continue reading ]]>

The Forsyth Astronomical Society will host their next monthly meeting on May 23rd at 7:30 PM at Kaleideum (formerly Sciworks) in Winston-Salem. The program this month will be by Joseph Holmes, a recent graduate of Guilford College, rising graduate student at Appalachian State University and long-time volunteer at GTCC’s Cline Observatory. Joseph will be speaking about current developments in the very dynamic field of exoplanet research. Following the presentation portion, we will have a brief business meeting and as always, there will be an informal social gathering 30 minutes or so before the meeting. All meetings are open to the public, free of charge and all are welcome. Hope to see you there.

A reminder to club members: It’s getting to be that time again, we are coming up on the May renewal for annual dues. You can pay them at any meeting between this month and May. Another reminder, also, as per a club vote a few months back the dues are now $35/year for individuals, $40/year for a family membership and our student rate is still $5/year. For anyone else, if you have ever wanted to join our organization now is the prime time to do it. Don’t forget to renew your Astronomical League membership as well if you participate in that group. Don’t know about the Astronomical League ask club member Sean Wood, the FAS AL correspondent.

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Young Astronomers Newsletter May 2017 http://www.fas37.org/wp/young-astronomers-newsletter-may-2017/ Wed, 03 May 2017 18:47:28 +0000 http://www.fas37.org/wp/?p=1799 Continue reading ]]> The Young Astronomers Newsletter

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The Young Astronomers Newsletter Volume 25 Number 5 May 2017

By Bob Patsiga

 

 

In this month’s edition of the newsletter Bob discusses:

  • Updates on the New Horizons mission.
  • How measurements of neutrinos during a Supernova will be used to follow the progress of the event.
  • How we are getting better at detecting Dark Matter and how it’s helping shape galaxies.
  • How X-ray bursts are being used to determine the size of stars that are being devoured by Black Holes.
  • How orbital patterns and angle of rotation effect seasons.
  • This year is the centennial year of operation of the Hooker telescope at Mount Wilson.
  • Astronomical May birthdays.
  • Celestial happenings and sightings in May.
  • Orbital terms word search.
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April Meeting of the Forsyth Astronomical Society 4/25 http://www.fas37.org/wp/april-meeting-of-the-forsyth-astronomical-society-425/ Tue, 25 Apr 2017 14:11:57 +0000 http://www.fas37.org/wp/?p=1795 Continue reading ]]>

The Forsyth Astronomical Society will host their next monthly meeting on April 25th at 7:30 PM at Kaleideum (formerly Sciworks) in Winston-Salem. The presentation for this month will be “Chasing Pluto” and in-depth, behind-the -scenes look
at the New Horizons mission. Following the presentation portion we will have a brief business meeting and as always there will be an informal social gathering 30 minutes or so before the meeting. All meetings are open to the public and free of charge, all are welcome. Hope to see you there.

A reminder to club members: It’s getting to be that time again, we are coming up on the May renewal for annual dues. You can pay them at any meeting between this month and May. Another reminder, also, as per a club vote a few months back the dues are now $35/year for individuals, $40/year for a family membership and our student rate is still $5/year. For any one else, if you have ever wanted to join our organization now is the prime time to do it. Don’t forget to renew your Astronomical League membership as well if you participate in that group. Don’t know about the Astronomical League ask club member Sean Wood, the FAS AL corespondent.

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Forsyth Astronomical Society’s Astronomical April http://www.fas37.org/wp/forsyth-astronomical-societys-astronomical-april/ Sat, 01 Apr 2017 19:52:19 +0000 http://www.fas37.org/wp/?p=1778 Continue reading ]]>

The FAS has a hectic April in store for all of our friends and followers. We have four public observations scheduled at different venues, Kaleideum North (Sciworks), Yadkin County Park, Pilot Mountain State Park and Stone Mountain State Park. Most are being held in conjunction with the NC Science Festival and their Statewide Star Party events. As per usual these events are weather dependent each event in this post and the club’s Facebook page will be updated with a final weather call by 5pm the day before the event.

 

UPDATE: 4/7/17

We are a GO for tomorrow’s observation at Kaleideum North. 

Conditions should be clear with temps in the high 50’s to low 60’s. Dress accordingly.

 

Our first public event will be held on April 8th at the Kaleideum North (formerlySciworks). This is our home base of operations. We hold our monthly meetings here and it’s our most used site for urban public observations. The sun will be setting around 8pm this day. We’ll start observing as darkness falls and targets become available in the waning twilight. Objects we hope to show will include the Moon, several star clusters or varying types, binary stars, the Great Orion Nebula and Jupiter (later in the evening), and possibly even a galaxy, though faintly, through some of the larger member scopes. We will remain set up until around 10-11pm depending on conditions and public interest.

 

Update 4/20: The FAS observation at Yadkinville Park on April 21st has been CANCELLED due to adverse weather conditions.

Our next event will be held on April 21st at the Yadkin County Park located behind the Yadkinville YMCA. We will be set up on the lower soccer field. Click the attached photo to the left to be taken to Google Maps for navigation directions. Sunset is around 8pm for this event as well and as with our earlier event this month we’ll observe similar targets as they become available as it gets dark. Albeit targets should be better due to the moon setting earlier that day. When conditions cooperate observing is great.

 

Update 4/20: The FAS observation at Pilot Mountain State Park on April 21st has been CANCELLED due to adverse weather conditions.

We will have another observation on April 22nd at Pilot Mountain State Park in the upper
parking area. This is our premier public dark sky observing site. It really doesn’t get better for astronomical observing in the piedmont than atop Pilot Mountain. When the conditions are right it rivals some locations on the Blue Ridge. As with our previous observations, we will begin observing as darkness falls and targets are available. The observation will conclude at 10:30pm. Atop the mountain the temperature can be as much as 10 degrees cooler than the surrounding area. Please keep in mind that when planning attire for coming out, especially concerning little ones.

 

Update 4/28: The Stone Mountain observation has been CANCELLED as well. We just can’t seem to catch a break with the weather. Our next scheduled public even is on June 27 at Stone Mountain again. Stay tuned to our website or Facebook page for more info as the date draws near.

Our last observing event for the month will be at Stone Mountain State Park on April 28th. This observation will kick off our 2017 observations for campers at the park. This is an excellent venue probably second to Pilot but still very good.  As with all of our observation at the site, THIS IS A LOCK-IN EVENT. If you attend as a non camper you will be required to stay the entire length of the observation and leave as the club members leave. The park gate will be locked at 8pm. We typically stay set up until Getting set upbetween 10:30-11 pm depending on conditions and interest. For a map marking the observation site in the family camping area click the image to the left. Access to the site can be gained between campsites 35 and 36. Please be respectful of others camp setups. As with Pilot this location can be cooler than you expect. Plan your attire accordingly.

 

If you attend any one of these events you will see similar night sky objects at each but if you attend multiple events you will definitely get a feel for how viewing conditions can change dramatically with light pollution, particulate pollution, elevation, weather conditions and how each effect astronomical observing. We hope you have opportunity to attend all venues.  If any of these events are not in your area or you’re interested in finding other STEM related activities held in conjunction with the NC Science Festival, click the graphic below to be taken to the NC Science Festival events page to find an event near you.

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